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  • Overview of Proposed Changes to Basic Boating Knowledge American National Standards

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This webinar explores the draft Core-Plus Outcome-based format for new American National Standards for Basic Boating Knowledge.

    This webinar explores the draft Core-Plus Outcome-based format for new American National Standards for Basic Boating Knowledge. These standards include those used as the foundation for NASBLA course approval, resulting in approximately 500,000 course certificates awarded annually. The proposed ‘Core’ format begins with common information shared by all boating disciplines, with additional ‘Plus’ information for power boating, water-jet propelled, sailing, and human-propelled activity. The outcome based re-design brings additional alignment between the knowledge and on-water skill standards. (Note: Skill standards are not part of this public review process.) This webinar shares the latest drafts open for public review and review the process to submit comments via EZ-ESP. The comment period closes December 5, 2019.

    Amanda Perez

    Director of Education, BoatUS Foundation

    Amanda Pérez has been educating recreational boaters with the BoatU.S. Foundation for over 13 years. In her current role as Director of Education, she manages the free online boating safety course, specialized courses, website and other online assets and media as well as the team of developers, designers and project managers who keep those programs running.

    Amanda serves on the National Education Standards Panel whose mission is to “Establish and maintain recreational boating education standards to increase safety on our nation’s waterways.” In addition, Amanda also serves on the NASBLA Education and Outreach committee, helping to shape boating safety marketing and education best practices.

    A lifelong boater, Amanda has spent nearly her entire career working in the boating industry. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communications from Towson University and a Master of Arts from St. John’s College.

    Pam Dillon

    NASBLA Director of Education & Standards

    Pamela Dillon serves as director of NASBLA’s Education and Standards Division. In this role, she works to fully articulate NASBLA’s national role in standards development and conformity assessment, as well as providing broader and deeper professional development opportunities for our members and the recreational boating community. Previously, Dillon served as BLA, retiring in 2011 as chief of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Watercraft. During a five-year break in service from the state of Ohio, Dillon served as executive director of the American Canoe Association (2002-2007), working to develop strategic alliances with boating, outdoor recreation, and paddlesport education and conservation programs across the U.S. and Canada. Dillon served two terms as a public member of the National Boating Safety Advisory Council. In 2014 Dillon earned her credential as a Certified Association Executive (CAE) from ASAE.

  • 2019 Special Report on Paddlesports & Safety

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    In this session you will learn more about the changing demographics of paddle participants and the role safety plays when they head out on the water.

    Join OIA research and intelligence manager James Rein as he shares data and findings from the new 2019 Special Report on Paddlesports and Safety, a joint partnership with the ACA, USCG and NASBLA. In this session you will learn more about the changing demographics of paddle participants and the role safety plays when they head out on the water.

    James Rein

    Manager of Market & Consumer Insights, Outdoor Industry Association

    Originally from Jacksonville FL, James has 10 years of experience in retail operations, customer analytics, and retail sales from a variety of companies including The Home Depot. Landing a job with the Outdoor Industry Association is a true dream job after many years in a big corporate environment. James moved back to Colorado in 2015 after spending 6 years in Atlanta. His love of the outdoors, big mountains, fresh snow and great trails made it an easy decision. On the weekends it’s hard to figure out whether James will be climbing in Eldo, mountain biking in Buffalo Creek, trail running the Flat Irons, or fly fishing the South Platte. One thing is for sure he will be outside no matter the condition with his dog Breck closely in tow.

  • When Good Boats Go Bad: FL's Derelict Vessels - A Case Study in Prevention and Legal Response

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This session will explore the new Florida derelict vessel law and what qualifies as “at risk,” as well as how the state is implementing the law’s provisions, including creating a test for determining if a vessel has an “effective means of propulsion for safe navigation” (one of the “at risk” law’s criteria).

    Derelict vessels (DVs) are environmental, access, and human safety threats. Some jurisdictions have implemented voluntary turn-in programs (VTIP) as preventative measures attempting to lessen the impact of DVs. Florida has taken a different and novel approach, recently passing a law prohibiting vessels “at risk of becoming derelict” from being upon the waters of the state. This session will explore the new law and what qualifies as “at risk,” as well as how the state is implementing the law’s provisions, including creating a test for determining if a vessel has an “effective means of propulsion for safe navigation” (one of the “at risk” law’s criteria). In addition, in 2017, the state stopped investigating all derelict vessels for nearly six months while implementing new procedures to ensure vessel owners’ Constitutional due process rights were not being violated. Why was this drastic action necessary? How has the state program changed? What lessons are there for other jurisdictions from Florida’s lessons learned? This session will answer these questions.

    Brandy Elliott

    Senior Attorney; Boating and Waterways Advisor, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

    Brandy E. Elliott is a passionate advocate for safe and lawful boating in Florida. She is a Florida attorney whose primary responsibility is advising the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s (Commission) Division of Law Enforcement, Boating and Waterways Section. She is, in fact, the State’s only attorney advising legal issues related to boating. Among her other responsibilities, Brandy served as the legal process expert for crafting the State’s standardized procedures to ensure due process in the removal and destruction of derelict vessels, and with Commission policy experts, trained law enforcement officers and local government authorities on these processes throughout the entire State. 

    Brandy is legal advisor to the State’s statutorily created Boating Advisory Council. She has worked with boating associations, lobbyists, and public officials crafting boating legislation and working for its successful passage by the Florida legislature for many years.

    Brandy has been practicing law for 11 years and has been with the Commission for nine. She is also a trial and appellate attorney, handling all forms of litigation for the Commission. She has both a juris doctorate and a Masters in Applied American Politics and Policy from Florida State University.

  • Innovators Create a New Boating Market, New Type of Boater & New Enforcement Challenges

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This panel discussion will present valuable insights into these boat club and owner-rental operations challenges, the current market and the future expansion of these innovative routes to boating.

    Boaters today need not be traditional boat owners or ever own a boat to have affordable, regular access to the water, often from many locations. Boat clubs, companies offering fractional ownership and owner-rental operations face challenges in safety education, compliance with regulations in multiple states, and often the need to educate law enforcement with the intricacies of their programs.This panel discussion will present valuable insights into these challenges, the current market and the future expansion of these innovative routes to boating.

    David Dickerson

    Vice President of State Government Relations, National Marine Manufacturers Association

    A Florida native who grew up boating on Tampa Bay, David first worked as a political reporter and bureau chief for Florida newspapers before moving to Washington to be press secretary for former Senator Bill Nelson. His work included managing media relations after the Challenger space shuttle accident for the House Space Science Subcommittee. Thereafter, he was Vice President of Communications at the Wine and Spirits Wholesalers of America and managed the industry’s adaptation to online liquor sales. He joined NMMA in 2003. He currently manages NMMA’s state-level political strategy and actions in all 50 states, where concerns frequently include boater access, taxation, manufacturing regulation, aquatic invasive species, and safety issues. 

    Fiona McGlynn

    Contributing Editor, BoatU.S. Magazine

    Fiona McGlynn is a contributing editor at BoatU.S. Magazine and an award-winning freelance writer. She recently completed a 13,000 mile sail from Vancouver to Mexico to Australia on a 35-foot sailboat and now lives in Atlin, BC (two hours from the Alaska border) where she's a board member of Atlin Search and Rescue. Her stories have taken her many places, from investigating why millennials don't own boats to covering retro round-the-world yacht races. Fiona is also a contributing editor at Good Old Boat Magazine and an editor at WaterborneMag.com. This month she has a story in BoatU.S. Magazine that explores the ins and outs of peer-to-peer boating insurance. 

    John Giglio

    President, Freedom Boat Club

    John Giglio is President of Freedom Boat Club, the world’s largest and oldest private boating club in the nation now celebrating its 30th anniversary. With 35,000 members in 195 locations throughout the United States, Canada and Europe and sporting a fleet of more than 2300 boats. Freedom Boat Club offers an attractive alternative to boat ownership and delivers memories that last a lifetime.

    A business graduate of Florida Southern College with an MBA from the University of South Florida, Mr. Giglio was part owner of a 20-chain auto body repair firm prior to joining Freedom Boat Club in 2004 as operations manager for its corporate-owned stores, a post he held for three years. He was promoted to sales manager, and within six months, was named director of sales and operations. He and his former partner purchased the company in 2011 and Mr. Giglio was named president of Freedom Boat Club LLC. Just a little more than a year later, in May 2012, he bought out his partner and became president and CEO, with direct responsibility for all franchise and corporate operations. He held the CEO role until his sale of the business to Brunswick Corporation in May 2019.

  • R3 & Recreational Boating

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    R3 and Recreational Boating will explore recruitment, retention and reactivation of participants in recreational boating. R3 stands for recruitment, retention, and reactivation and R3 activities seek to create new participants or increase participation rates of current or lapsed outdoor recreationists.

    R3 and Recreational Boating will explore recruitment, retention and reactivation of participants in recreational boating. R3 stands for recruitment, retention, and reactivation and R3 activities seek to create new participants or increase participation rates of current or lapsed outdoor recreationists. R3 efforts help to identify how we can effectively support boating opportunities, access and education. The Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation (RBFF), the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (AFWA), Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) and state natural resource agencies throughout the country are working to develop and implement effective angler and boater R3 efforts. National guidelines, recommendations and resources have been developed to assist state agencies in their R3 plan development and implementation. Join us to hear about R3 efforts nationally, state agency success stories and resources you can leverage in your state to grow recreational boating participation.

    Stephanie Hussey

    State R3 Program Director, Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation

    Stephanie Hussey has more than 25 years' experience working with state fish and wildlife agencies and is one of the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation’s (RBFF) veteran staff members. As State R3 Program Director, Stephanie serves as primary liaison with state fish and wildlife agencies in recruitment, retention and reactivation (R3) efforts and leads RBFF’s state R3 program development to help agencies increase participation in fishing and boating. Stephanie joined RBFF in December 2000 and has led the development and implementation of many key products and programs with state agencies. Prior to joining RBFF, Stephanie was the director of project development for Southwick Associates, where she marketed and promoted the company’s economic assessments of fish and wildlife-associated recreation. Stephanie started her career in fisheries and wildlife in 1993 as a research assistant for the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, assisting with various national fish and wildlife resource management projects. Stephanie received a B.S. degree in biology from Michigan State University and went to Utah State University for a Master’s in fisheries and wildlife.

    Tim Spice

    Boating Safety Education Manager • Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

    Tim Spice is the Boater Education Manager with Texas Parks and Wildlife. He began his career in January 1995 as a Hunter Education and Boater Education Training Specialist. In 2014, Spice received the Educator of the Year award from the Southern States Association of Boating Law Administrators. He is currently a member of the Education Standards Panel and a Subcommittee Chair on NASBLA’s Education & Outreach Committee. He is also a certified instructor trainer for the National Safe Boating Council.

  • Decoding Next Gen Life Jacket Labels

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Life jackets with new harmonized labels are available for purchase in stores now. These new labels look very different from the ones previous generations of boaters recognize and understand. Utilizing icons and fewer words, the public and law enforcement agencies are sure to have questions about purchasing and using the correct life jackets. Will you be prepared to help them?

    Life jackets with new harmonized labels are available for purchase in stores now. These new labels look very different from the ones previous generations of boaters recognize and understand. Utilizing icons and fewer words, the public and law enforcement agencies are sure to have questions about purchasing and using the correct life jackets. Will you be prepared to help them?

    During this presentation, Mark Chanski will brief the audience on how to decode the new life jacket icons, explain a Newton and touch upon other vital points of the new harmonized life jacket labels.

    Mark Chanski

    Deputy Education Director, NASBLA

    Mark joined NASBLA’s team of professionals as the Deputy Education Director in June of 2019. Prior to joining NASBLA, Mark worked for the State of Connecticut’s Boating Division for more than twelve years. While there, he initiated a number of innovative programs that focused on delivering the Division’s Safe and Clean Boating messages to the public. Mark was the lead coordinator for the Boating Division’s on-the-water outreach MV Prudence campaign, BOATS (Because Our Acquaintances Think Safety) Program, life jacket rebate program, paddlecraft education, and outreach campaigns and the administrator of the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s first social media campaign, Facebook page, Boating in Connecticut.

    Mark has extensive commercial and recreational maritime experience. He holds credentials, licenses, and certificates from the U.S. Coast Guard, American Canoe Association, Connecticut DEEP, National Association of State Law Administrators, National Safe Boating Council, and US Sailing. Mark has received numerous awards from state and national organizations for his efforts and achievements in the boating education field.

  • Changes to NASBLA BOAT Program Accreditation

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This session covers changes in capturing all student data and supporting Accredited Agencies as they become more autonomous in building their cadre of credentialed instructors.

    NABSLA’s BOAT Advisory Board recently enacted some significant change to NASBLA’s Boat Operation’s and Training (BOAT) Manual Volume I, which has eliminated the fee associated with receiving a NASBLA certificate from an approved In-Direct delivery class. The changes will also allow accredited agencies to groom Lead Instructor’s within their agency. This session will cover these changes in capturing all student data and supporting Accredited Agencies as they become more autonomous in building their cadre of credentialed instructors.

    Dave Considine

    BOAT Program Director • NASBLA

    Dave Considine came to NASBLA in March 2011 after retiring from the USCG. Considine became the BOAT Program’s Response Course Program Manager.In 2015 Considine became the BOAT Program Coordinator, overseeing the day-to-day operational logistics for the program.In November of 2016 Considine was promoted to the National Director for the BOAT Program.

    Before joining the NASBLA Staff, Considine was a Senior Chief Boatswain Mate in the United States Coast Guard.He attained the qualification of Surfman in 1996, the highest small boat qualification in the Coast Guard.Following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Considine was assigned to Boston’s Harbor Defense Team as a Tactical Boat Coxswain and Boarding Officer, and became the Supervisor of the Harbor Defense Team until 2003. Considine was then assigned to Group/Sector Boston as a Homeland Security Watchstander and Ready for Operations Team supervisor. He was assigned as the Officer in Charge of Motor Lifeboat Station Chatham on Cape Cod from 2005 – 2008. Considine was then assigned to the First Coast Guard Districts Field Intelligence Support Team as an Intelligence Officer until his retirement in 2011. 

    Considine was the Assistant Fire Chief at the South Hampton NH Fire Department following his retirement from the Coast Guard.He has been a Professional Ski Patroller at Loon Mountain for 29 years.He lives in South Hampton, NH with his wife Nancy, and two children, Kylie and Conor. He is an active Rotarian, and continues to fly as a “Flying Santa” for the Friends of Flying Santa program that delivers toys at the holidays to the children of Active Duty Coast Guard personnel.

    John Fetterman

    NASBLA Deputy Executive Director, Advocacy, Enforcement & Officer Training

    John Fetterman was hired by NASBLA in January 2010 as the association’s first Law Enforcement Director. In this capacity, Fetterman worked to integrate and coordinate law enforcement programs within NASBLA and to improve the nonprofit organization’s law enforcement program value to its members through education and consulting services. Fetterman and his team launched NASBLA’s Boat Operations and Training Program (BOAT) in April of 2010, NASBLA to date has trained over 10,000 federal, state, local and tribal maritime law enforcement officers and maritime response professionals. 

    On March 13, 2014, John was promoted to Deputy Executive Director. 

    Before joining the NASBLA staff, Fetterman, a native of Pittsburgh, PA worked for the Maine Bureau of Marine Patrol for 32 years. He began his career with the Maine agency in 1977 as a field officer. Much of his career with the Marine Patrol was spent as chief pilot, flying some 12,000 hours in multiple aircraft. In non-flight duties, Major Fetterman also supervised the Bureau’s Special Services and served for over 20 years on the Emergency Response Team within the Maine Emergency Management Agency. In 2001 he was promoted to Deputy Chief and served as the Coastal Boating Law Administrator for the state of Maine until December 2009. 

    Fetterman joined NASBLA’s Executive Board as a member-at-large in 2005-06, then led NASBLA as president in 2007-08. Fetterman also served as vice chair of NASBLA’s new Homeland Security Committee (now the Preparedness & Response Committee), in 2004, and as the committee chair in 2005. In June 2006, he was appointed to the U.S. Coast Guard National Boating Safety Advisory Council, where he served two three year terms and in 2012 served a 3 year term on the National Maritime Security Advisory Committee. In addition to his NASBLA assignments, Fetterman also serves at the senior contract staff representative to the Life Jacket Association.

    Deputy Director Fetterman and his wife, Cathy, live in Manchester, Maine, and have four grown and married children and six grandchildren.

  • Visual Distress Signals

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Electronic Visual Distress Signals and Life Jacket Harmonization: Quick update on status.

    Electronic Visual Distress Signals and Life Jacket Harmonization: Quick update on status.

    Tom Dardis

    RBS Outreach Coordinator, U.S. Coast Guard Boating Safety Division (CG-BSX-21)

    Started my Coast Guard career on the USCGC Eagle. Attended Aviation Survivalman and the Navy Rescue Swimmer School. Served at Air Stations Sitka, Cape May, Clearwater, Atlantic City, and Detroit. Spent one tour as the Recruiter in Charge in Providence, RI. Served in the Office of Boat Forces, as the Rescue and Survival Systems Program Manager. I closed out my Coast Guard career assigned as an Afloat Safety Specialist in Office of Safety and Environmental Health's Afloat Safety Division.

    Have served as the Recreational Boating Safety Outreach Coordinator in the Boating Safety Division, Coast Guard Headquarters since 2015.

  • Open for Comment: Core-Plus Format for National Boating Education Standards

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This update will review how to submit public review comments on the draft ‘Core-Plus’ Outcome-based American National Standards for Boating Knowledge.

    This update will review how to submit public review comments on the draft ‘Core-Plus’ Outcome-based American National Standards for Boating Knowledge. These standards are used as the foundation for NASBLA course approval. The proposed ‘Core’ format captures information shared by all boating disciplines, with additional ‘Plus’ content for power boating, water-jet propelled, sailing, and human-propelled activity.

    Amanda Perez

    Director of Education, BoatUS Foundation

    Amanda Pérez has been educating recreational boaters with the BoatU.S. Foundation for over 13 years. In her current role as Director of Education, she manages the free online boating safety course, specialized courses, website and other online assets and media as well as the team of developers, designers and project managers who keep those programs running.

    Amanda serves on the National Education Standards Panel whose mission is to “Establish and maintain recreational boating education standards to increase safety on our nation’s waterways.” In addition, Amanda also serves on the NASBLA Education and Outreach committee, helping to shape boating safety marketing and education best practices.

    A lifelong boater, Amanda has spent nearly her entire career working in the boating industry. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communications from Towson University and a Master of Arts from St. John’s College.

    Jeff Wheeler

    Deputy Chief, Office of Boat Forces

    Jeff Wheeler is the Deputy Chief of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Office of Boat Forces located at Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, DC. The Office of Boat Forces enables mission performance in support of the strategic goals of the Coast Guard, providing human capital and capabilities necessary to effectively operate boats to meet Coast Guard mission requirements.

    He came to Boat Forces in 2000 while still on active duty, assuming the role of Manager, Boat Crew Training and Doctrine. In this capacity, he was responsible for the management, oversight and development of the service-wide boat crew training program and boat readiness and standardization program. Mr. Wheeler retired from active duty in 2003 and continued to serve the Office of Boat Forces in a civilian capacity. In 2008, Mr. Wheeler assumed the Deputy Chief position in which he is responsible for assisting the office Chief in the direct supervision, management and strategic development of the Boat Forces program. 

    Prior to his assignments within the Office of Boat Forces, Mr. Wheeler served at multiple operational field commands throughout the country performing law enforcement, search and rescue, and aids to navigation missions. Mr. Wheeler has held numerous operational and boat competencies within the Coast Guard, including Surfman, which have provided a profound knowledge of boat operations and mission requirements. He attended the Federal Executive Institute, Charlottesville VA in 2009.

    Pam Dillon

    NASBLA Director of Education & Standards

    Pamela Dillon serves as director of NASBLA’s Education and Standards Division. In this role, she works to fully articulate NASBLA’s national role in standards development and conformity assessment, as well as providing broader and deeper professional development opportunities for our members and the recreational boating community. Previously, Dillon served as BLA, retiring in 2011 as chief of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Watercraft. During a five-year break in service from the state of Ohio, Dillon served as executive director of the American Canoe Association (2002-2007), working to develop strategic alliances with boating, outdoor recreation, and paddlesport education and conservation programs across the U.S. and Canada. Dillon served two terms as a public member of the National Boating Safety Advisory Council. In 2014 Dillon earned her credential as a Certified Association Executive (CAE) from ASAE.

  • Cold Water Immersion, Pathways to Drowning & Possible Interventions

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    In this presentation the physiological responses to cold water immersion will be briefly reviewed to help target and promote interventions such as training, equipment and treatment protocols that reduce immersion deaths.

    Immersion in cold water represents one of the greatest environmental stresses to which the body can be exposed, and immersion is the second most common cause of accidental death in many countries of the world. However, it is a relatively “hidden” killer with many of the 1,000+ immersion-related deaths that occur each day worldwide going unnoticed. Drowning is also a “disease of youth”, 64% of deaths are < 30 years old; 25% are < 5years old.

    In this presentation the physiological responses to cold water immersion will be briefly reviewed. The importance of understanding these physiological responses lies in the insight it gives to “the cause of the cause of death”; this can help target and promote interventions such as training, equipment and treatment protocols that reduce immersion deaths.

    Mike Tipton, MBE, PhD, MSc, BEd (Hons), FPhysiol

    Associate Head (Research) Department of Sport & Exercise Science, University of Portsmouth

    Educated at the Universities of Keele and London, Professor Tipton joined the University of Surrey in 1986. After 12 years at the Robens Institute and European Institute of Health and Medical Science he moved to the University of Portsmouth in 1998. In addition to his University positions, Professor Tipton was based at the Institute of Naval Medicine (INM) from 1983 to 2004 and was Consultant Head of the Environmental Medicine Division of the INM from 1996. He has spent over 35 years researching and advising the military, industry and elite sports people in the areas of drowning and thermoregulation, environmental and occupational physiology and survival in the sea. He has published over 600 scientific papers, reports, chapters in these areas as well as the books, “The Essentials of Sea Survival” (Golden & Tipton, 2002) and “The Science of Beach Lifeguarding” (Tipton & Wooler, 2016).

    Professor Tipton has been a consultant in survival and thermal medicine to the Royal Air Force and UKSport; he recently completed 10 years on the Royal National Lifeboat Institution’s Medical & Survival Committee and is now a member of their Council. In 2004 he was made an Honorary Life Member of the International Association for Safety & Survival Training in recognition of his work in sea survival. Prof Tipton is a Trustee/Director of Surf Lifesaving GB. He was Senior Editor of the journals “Ergonomics”, “The International Journal of Biometeorology” and “Extreme Physiology and Medicine” and is currently Editor-in-Chief of The Physiological Society’s journal “Experimental Physiology”.Prof Tipton is a Fellow of both the Royal Society of Medicine and The Physiological Society, and has been awarded a MBE for services to physiological research in extreme environments. Prof Tipton provides advice to a range of universities, government departments, industries, medical, search and rescue and media organizations.