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  • Wake-Related Activity

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    A look at effects of wake boats on New Hampshire's public waters, efforts to address the issues and multiple-use waterway management.

    Tim Dunleavy, New Hampshire Boating Law Administrator, recently served as a member of the New Hampshire State Legislature’s Commission, charged with studying the effects of wake boats on NH’s public waters. Dunleavy will speak to the Commission’s final report and the issues that wake boats and wake surfing are causing in NH. Chris Bischoff, Water Sports Industry Association, will speak of efforts to address wake boat issues. Pamela Dillon will provide an update on the USCG grant project to create the Guide for Multiple-Use Waterway Issues (Third Edition).

    Tim Dunleavy

    Captain, Boating Law Administrator, New Hampshire State Police – Marine Patrol

    As a 32-year veteran of the New Hampshire State Police Marine Patrol Unit, Captain Tim Dunleavy has been the unit’s Commander and NH Boating Law Administrator for the last ten years. Overseeing 75 sworn and civilian employees, Dunleavy’s oversight includes law enforcement operations, the boating education program, patrol fleet maintenance, and aids to navigation deployment and repair. Dunleavy also serves as the unit’s legislative liaison where he has served on various legislative commissions. Most recently, he was a member of the state’s Commission to Study Wake Boats and the Study of Shoreland Structures.

    Captain Dunleavy is currently a member of the New Hampshire Port Security Committee and Sector Northern New England’s Area Maritime Security-Executive Steering Committee. He is currently serving his third term as a member of the Nation Boating Safety Advisory Committee (NBSAC) and is the current chair of NASBLA’s Executive Board.

    Chris Bischoff

    Waterway Access – Chairman, Water Sports Industry Association

    Chris Bischoff has been in the water sports industry for nearly 25 years. He started out as a competitive wakeboarder in the late 1990’s. He was a professional wakeboarder for six years, and then started exploring other areas of the wakeboarding industry. Over the years, Bischoff has worked as team manager for companies such as Reef Footwear, Obrien Wakeboards and Tige Boats. He has also been the chief judge and tournament director for the Pro Wakeboard Tour.

    Bischoff currently works as an operations consultant for the Pro Wakeboard Tour and for the World Wake Association in addition to his job at the WSIA handling Waterway Access Issues and Government Relations.

    When Bischoff is not dealing with some angry lake association about wakesurfing, he spends his time with his wife and two boys in Orlando, Florida, where they spend their free time racing dirt bikes or out on the lake!

    Pam Dillon

    Project Specialist

    Pamela Dillon serves as project specialist for the National Boating Education Standards Panel (ESP). In this role, she works to fully articulate NASBLA’s national role in standards development and conformity assessment. Previously, Dillon served as BLA, retiring in 2011 as chief of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Watercraft. During a five-year break in service from the state of Ohio, Dillon served as executive director of the American Canoe Association (2002-2007), working to develop strategic alliances with boating, outdoor recreation, and paddlesport education and conservation programs across the U.S. and Canada. Dillon served two terms as a public member of the National Boating Safety Advisory Council. In 2014 Dillon earned her credential as a Certified Association Executive (CAE) from ASAE.

  • Recreational Boating & Fishing: Riding the Wave of Participation

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    RBFF President Frank Peterson and SVP of Marketing & Communications Stephanie Vatalaro provide attendees with the latest boating and fishing participation numbers, give an update on their “Get on Board” campaign and share trends that are driving 2020 participation.

    RBFF President Frank Peterson and SVP of Marketing & Communications Stephanie Vatalaro provide attendees with the latest boating and fishing participation numbers, give an update on their “Get on Board” campaign and share trends that are driving 2020 participation.

    Frank Peterson

    President/CEO, Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation

    Frank Peterson joined the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation (RBFF) as President and CEO in 2007. Peterson began his career developing and implementing successful corporate strategies for Mobil Oil Corporations’ U.S. marketing and refining segments.

    At RBFF, Peterson turned his organizational and marketing skills to increasing participation in recreational boating and fishing. He established close relations with RBFF stakeholders, including boating and fishing industries, and expanded programs that support state agency efforts to attract more people to boating and fishing. He also spearheaded research studies that guide RBFF and stakeholder initiatives, and mobilized broad-based expertise to support RBFF objectives.

    In 2008, Peterson led the re-branding of RBFF’s Take Me Fishing™ consumer outreach campaign and website, TakeMeFishing.org, transforming it into a popular, interactive, content-rich site. He also led the development of RBFF’s highly successful state marketing programs, moving them from pilot efforts to nationwide outreach campaigns. Peterson spearheaded the development of the fishing and boating industry’s first-ever Hispanic outreach campaign and website, Vamos A Pescar™ and VamosAPescar.org. He has also been instrumental in expanding all of RBFF’s digital tools to keep up with consumer technology, developing mobile-friendly versions of the campaign websites, an interactive Places to Boat and Fish Map, and a Boat Ramp App.

    Stephanie Vatalaro

    Senior Vice President, Marketing & Communications, RBFF

    Stephanie Vatalaro is the Senior Vice President of Marketing & Communications at the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation (RBFF), where she leads the consumer and stakeholder outreach strategy for RBFF and its Take Me Fishing™ and Vamos A Pescar™ brand campaigns.

    A communication professional with 20 years’ experience in corporate, agency, non-profit and newsroom settings, Vatalaro has devoted the last 13 years of her career to getting more people out on the water fishing and boating and conserving our nation’s aquatic natural resources. 

    Vatalaro received her Bachelor of Science degree from Florida State University. She grew up in the Florida Keys and is the daughter of a flats fishing guide. She now spends summers fishing and boating with her family on the Potomac River in Virginia. 

  • Time, Distance and Shielding - SFST Best Practices

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This session explains how NASBLA, Louisiana State University (LSU), The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and the National Center for Biomedical Research and Training (NCBRT) partnered to create two quick training videos to remind officers how to stay safe while conducting BUI/DWI investigations.​

    How officers can utilize time, distance and shielding to protect themselves and the public while conducting Standardized Field Sobriety Tests (SFSTs) is critical to the job.  This session will explain how NASBLA, Louisiana State University (LSU), The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and the National Center for Biomedical Research and Training (NCBRT) partnered to create two quick training videos to remind officers how to stay safe while conducting BUI/DWI investigations.

    Todd Radabaugh

    Executive Director, StreetSafe

    Todd Radabaugh currently serves as the executive director of StreetSafe, a nonprofit organization that works with court systems in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee. StreetSafe utilizes first responders to conduct hands-on driving programs to bring awareness of common crash causes to young drivers. In addition, StreetSafe conducts drug and alcohol education classes, in partnership with the court system, throughout North Carolina.

    Radabaugh retired from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) at the rank of captain after 30 years of service. The day after his retirement, Radabaugh was sworn in with the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office. He has been a Standing Standardized Field Sobriety Testing instructor for twenty years, and has been instructing the Seated Battery since 2010. Radabaugh became both the first Drug Recognition Expert, and Drug Recognition Expert Instructor in North Carolina, whose primary duties were maritime-based and did not involve traffic enforcement. In 2012, he was recognized as North Carolina’s Drug Recognition Expert of the Year.

    In his free time, Radabaugh enjoys hunting, fishing, surfing and spending time with his family.  He keeps his fifteen-month old granddaughter four days a week while her parents are at work and has learned how to maximize productivity during her two-hour nap windows.

  • Update on National Boating Education Standards

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Join members of the Panel for an update on this new proposed approach to Basic Boating Knowledge Standards.

    The National Boating Education Standards Panel is reviewing public comments for five draft American National Standards:

    • Basic Boating Knowledge – Core
    • Basic Boating Knowledge – Plus Human-Propelled
    • Basic Boating Knowledge – Plus Sailing
    • Basic Boating Knowledge – Plus Power
    • Basic Boating Knowledge Supplement – Plus Water-jet Propelled

    Join members of the Panel for an update on this new proposed approach to Basic Boating Knowledge Standards.

    Click here to see the current versions of Draft Basic Boating Knowledge standards under review by the National Boating Education Standards Panel.

    Amanda Perez

    Director of Education, BoatUS Foundation

    Amanda Pérez has been educating recreational boaters with the BoatU.S. Foundation for over 13 years. In her current role as Director of Education, she manages the free online boating safety course, specialized courses, website and other online assets and media as well as the team of developers, designers and project managers who keep those programs running.

    Amanda serves on the National Education Standards Panel whose mission is to “Establish and maintain recreational boating education standards to increase safety on our nation’s waterways.” In addition, Amanda also serves on the NASBLA Education and Outreach committee, helping to shape boating safety marketing and education best practices.

    A lifelong boater, Amanda has spent nearly her entire career working in the boating industry. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communications from Towson University and a Master of Arts from St. John’s College.

    Jeff Wheeler

    Deputy Chief, USCG Office of Boat Forces; Chair, Education Standards Panel

    Jeff Wheeler is the deputy chief of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Office of Boat Forces, located at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, DC. The Office of Boat Forces enables mission performance in support of the strategic goals of the Coast Guard, providing human capital and capabilities necessary to effectively operate boats to meet Coast Guard mission requirements.

    Wheeler came to the Office of Boat Forces in 2000 while still on active duty, assuming the role of manager, boat crew training and doctrine. In this capacity, he was responsible for the management, oversight and development of the service-wide boat crew training program and boat readiness and standardization program. Wheeler retired from active duty in 2003 and continued to serve the Office of Boat Forces in a civilian capacity. In 2008, he assumed the deputy chief position in which he is responsible for assisting the office chief in the direct supervision, management and strategic development of the Boat Forces program. 
    Prior to his assignments within the Office of Boat Forces, Wheeler served at multiple operational field commands throughout the country performing law enforcement, search and rescue, and aids to navigation missions. Wheeler has held numerous operational and boat competencies within the Coast Guard, including Surfman, which have provided him a profound knowledge of boat operations and mission requirements. He attended the Federal Executive Institute, Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2009.

    Wheeler was the recipient of a 2010 Nextgov Award. This is an inaugural program to recognize federal managers who overcame bureaucratic inertia and political resistance to establish innovative processes that improved government operations and citizens’ lives.  

    Wheeler won the award for his work with NASBLA in the creation of NASBLA’s Boat Operations and Training (BOAT) Program. Through this initiative, he established a single standard of training and credentialing of state, county, local and tribal organizations in support of interoperability and force multiplication. 

    Pam Dillon

    Project Specialist

    Pamela Dillon serves as project specialist for the National Boating Education Standards Panel (ESP). In this role, she works to fully articulate NASBLA’s national role in standards development and conformity assessment. Previously, Dillon served as BLA, retiring in 2011 as chief of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Watercraft. During a five-year break in service from the state of Ohio, Dillon served as executive director of the American Canoe Association (2002-2007), working to develop strategic alliances with boating, outdoor recreation, and paddlesport education and conservation programs across the U.S. and Canada. Dillon served two terms as a public member of the National Boating Safety Advisory Council. In 2014 Dillon earned her credential as a Certified Association Executive (CAE) from ASAE.

  • Overview of the National Recreational Boating Safety Survey (NRBSS)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    The NRBSS findings are presented in two reports: the Participation Survey Final Report and the Exposure Survey Final Report. This briefing will provide an overview of the highlights of these two reports.

    A primary goal of the National Recreational Boating Safety (RBS) program is to ensure safe boating behaviors by boat operators and passengers. Achieving this goal is a challenge, given limited resources, the changing preferences and characteristics of boaters, and the continual introduction of new recreational boats. Meeting this challenge requires that recreational boating professionals collect and analyze recreational boating data and learn all we can about boating behaviors and the corresponding linkages to incident risks.

     
    Acknowledging these complexities, the RBS Program and the National Boating Safety Advisory Council (NBSAC) identified improving and expanding recreational boating data collection as one of its 2017–21 Strategic Plan performance objectives. The purpose of the National Recreational Boating Safety Survey (NRBSS) is to produce scientific estimates of the number of characteristics of recreational boaters, the number of different types of recreational boats that are owned and operated, the size of the boating population, and the amount of exposure in an effort to assist agencies and organizations best meet nationwide boating safety practices and standards.
     
    The NRBSS findings are presented in two reports: the Participation Survey Final Report and the Exposure Survey Final Report. This briefing will provide an overview of the highlights of these two reports.

    Vann Burgess

    USCG RBS Specialist

    Vann Burgess retired from the United States Coast Guard in February of 2000 after serving more than 21 years on active duty. During his career, Burgess’s primary fields were Law Enforcement and Search and Rescue. His last tour of duty was as the coordinator and lead instructor for the Marine Patrol Officer’s Course and a regulatory subject matter expert for the Boarding Officer’s Course at the Coast Guard’s Maritime Law Enforcement School, Yorktown, Virginia.

     In July 2000, Burgess came to the U.S. Coast Guard Boating Safety Division, Coast Guard Headquarters, where he now serves as the Coast Guard’s Senior Recreational Boating Safety (RBS) Specialist. In his current position, Burgess oversees the programmatic operation of the State RBS Grant Program, provided under the Sport Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund and administered by the U.S. Coast Guard. This grant program provides funding to all U.S. states and territories for the purposes of vessel numbering, RBS law enforcement, RBS education, search and rescue and boating accident investigation and reporting. Burgess also serves as the programmatic lead for the Vessel Identification System (VIS), a national database for state numbered and Coast Guard documented vessels for the purposes of law enforcement and security.

     Vann Burgess is the Coast Guard’s Boating Safety liaison to the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA) and serves on the Boat Accident and Training (BOAT) Program Advisory Board.

  • Interactive Virtual HGN Training Innovation

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This session will introduce a breakthrough boating under the influence (BUI) training project that will effectively improve an officer’s skills at both administering and evaluating subject performance of the HGN test.

    Even before the COVID-19 pandemic all but shut down face-to-face training, the need to enhance the effective use of online, interactive officer training was becoming a priority. This session will introduce a breakthrough boating under the influence (BUI) training project that will effectively improve an officer’s skills at both administering and evaluating subject performance of the HGN test. Officers will be taught the correct administrative procedures, practice the procedures with feedback, and then “test-out” their new skills by demonstrating their proficiency on virtual test subjects.

    Richard Moore

    BUI Program Manager

    Richard Moore serves as the national BUI Program Manager for NASBLA and has been a leader in BUI training and enforcement efforts at both the state and national level since the mid-1990s. He retired from state employment with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s Division of Law Enforcement in March of 2017.   In that position, he served as the manager of the Boating and Waterways Section and was designated as Florida’s Boating Law Administrator for 15 years. With more than 27 years of fish, wildlife and boating law enforcement experience, his professional role included oversight of Florida’s boating safety, boating access and waterway management efforts.

  • Safety at Sea Takes a Leap Forward

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This presentation will share the process of the Lifejacket Van, what was experienced at the vans as fishermen made choices, and review ways by which community-informed research and implementation can lead to successful outcomes.

    Commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous occupations, and the East Coast has the highest number of commercial fishing fatalities in the United States. For New England commercial lobstermen, falls overboard are the most frequent cause of death. Researchers at the Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety (NEC) have been working to change that, one lifejacket at a time.

    The NEC is one of 11 agricultural centers across the country designated and funded by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Serving a 12-state region from Maine through West Virginia, the NEC promotes health and safety research, education, and prevention activities in the high-risk areas of farming, commercial fishing and logging.

    Since 2016, NEC researchers have evaluated barriers that lobstermen have experienced when considering lifejackets. In April 2019, researchers embarked on an eight-month campaign distributing lifejackets from two vans traveling from port to port along the Maine and Massachusetts coastlines. The “Lifejackets for Lobstermen” vans carried 11 models of personal flotation devices (PFDs), distributed at a 50% discount. The selection of PFDs was a culmination of more than 550 lobstermen giving guidance over the course of three years on the "ideal" working lifejacket. Two fieldwork coordinators navigated 10,000 miles up and down the coastline, parking the vans at 61 ports for a total of 157 days to promote the project and give lobstermen the chance to try on and purchase the lifejackets, selling over 1,087 PFDs.

    This presentation will share the process of the Lifejacket Van, what was experienced at the vans as fishermen made choices, and review ways by which community-informed research and implementation can lead to successful outcomes.

    Rebecca Weil

    Research Coordinator, Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety

    Rebecca Weil, MS, OTR/L is the commercial fishing research coordinator at the Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety: Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing (NEC). Her current work is with commercial lobstermen in Maine and Massachusetts, exploring ways to improve lifejacket use and to support a better understanding of falls overboard survival systems. She is also working with commercial fishermen in Oregon, Alaska, North Carolina and Massachusetts exploring the intersection of sleep deprivation and health. Since 2012, Weil has worked with farmers and fishermen for The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health (NYCAMH) and the NEC. Her previous work has been in occupational therapy, non-profit management and education.

  • Geofencing Success, How to Effectively Market with this New Technology

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Geofencing is a great new technology that allows you to target people based on their location. Find out what it is, how you can use it, and how you can make it work to drive revenue, educational content, and so much more. Boat ramps are proving a really great investment in geofencing, tune in to see why!

    Geofencing is a great new technology that allows you to target people based on their location. Find out what it is, how you can use it, and how you can make it work to drive revenue, educational content, and so much more. Boat ramps are proving a really great investment in geofencing, tune in to see why!

    Jenifer Wisniewski

    Chief of Outreach and Communications, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

    Jenifer Wisniewski is the Chief of Outreach and Communications for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and current president of Association of Conservation Information (ACI).  Wisniewski has worked actively over the last few years to bring marketing to the forefront of what agencies do to make a difference in recruiting, retaining and reactivating hunters and anglers (R3) as well as keeping our agencies and the work we do relevant to the public at large. She is the recent recipient of the first ever National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) Leader of the Pack R3 Award for being an innovator and leading nationally with R3 efforts. She is also a member of the Council to Advance Hunting and the Shooting Sports (CAHSS) Interagency Working Group and the chair of the marketing working group within that body. Her tactics in her current role have increased sales revenue for the first time in eight years in Tennessee and in her former role at Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR), her marketing successes increased license revenue overall by over 25% in five years, as well as reducing customer churn by 10%. Wisniewski’s success in Georgia and now Tennessee has garnered much attention nationwide and her efforts have been featured by national organizations like the Association of Conservation Information, The Council to Advance Hunting and Shooting Sports, Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation, Archery Trade Association, National Shooting Sports Foundation, Wildlife Management Institute and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. 

  • Throw Bags, Type IV Throwables and Potential Changes to the Federal Regulations

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    ​This panel discussion focuses on current discussions happening among the USCG Boating Safety Advisory Council around a Coast Guard Reauthorization requirement to consider throw bags in certain recreational boating applications.

    This panel discussion focuses on current discussions happening among the USCG Boating Safety Advisory Council around a Coast Guard Reauthorization requirement to consider throw bags in certain recreational boating applications. Many of the western states have very active whitewater industries and it has become apparent that throwable personal floatation devices (PFDs) on whitewater rivers are far less effective than throw bags when rescuing persons in the water. 

    In contrast, Type IV throwable devices currently required to be carried may increase the risk to the subject in the water when coupled with swimming ability and/or water and weather conditions. Based on a review of data submitted on Performance Report Part II, officers don’t seem to provide much credence to the need to have a Type IV Throwable Device onboard most any vessel. In this discussion, the panel will explore the history behind the reauthorization language, the use of throw bags in whitewater application and possible modification to federal preemption, and an alternative proposal that would more broadly apply to all vessels under 26’ in length and the carriage of the Type IV throwable.  

    Cody Jones

    Boating Law Administrator, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

    Cody is an Assistant Commander Game Warden assigned as the state of Texas Boating Law Administrator. Cody also serves on NASBLA’s Executive Board as the current Vice President of the Association. Cody is a native of Texas and resides in Dripping Springs with his wife Honey and three children Kylie, Cage and Cullen.

    Robin Pope

    Instructor Trainer Educator, American Canoe Association

    Robin Pope has been involved with boating and water safety education for nearly 40 years. He is an instructor trainer educator for the American Canoe Association (ACA) in both swiftwater rescue and whitewater kayaking, and has served in a number of leadership roles within the ACA. He acted as a subject matter expert in the development of the National On-Water Standards, helping to write both the human-propelled and the instructional approach standards, and served on NASBLA’s Education Standards Panel (ESP) for five years. Currently, Pope is a member of the National Boating Safety Advisory Council (NBSAC), chair of NBSAC’s Prevention Through People subcommittee and Branch Chief for the USCG Auxiliary’s AUXPAD Afloat program. 

    Ty Hunter

    BLA, Utah Division of State Parks & Recreation

    Ty Hunter received a Bachelor of Science degree in Recreation Resources Management from Utah State University in 1997 and completed Utah Peace Officers’ Standards and Training in 1998.  

    Hunter started his career with the Utah Division of Parks and Recreation in December of 1997 as a park ranger at Willard Bay State Park. He was promoted in October 2002 to the position of assistant manager at Yuba State Park. In June of 2003, Hunter became the park manager at Utah Lake State Park. After 10 years of service as a park manager, he was promoted to his current position as captain, overseeing the boating program for the Utah Division of Parks and Recreation and Boating Law Administrator for the state of Utah. Hunter is also the Underwater Remote Operated Vehicle Coordinator for the division.  

    Over his 22 year career, Hunter has observed many water-related incidents that resulted in the loss of life. He have interacted with many families and seen the hurt that the loss of a loved one causes. This is why he am passionate about water and boating safety and hope that through his efforts to promote life jacket safety that at least one life can be saved and their family will not need to experience such loss.  

    When Hunter is not at work he enjoy being with his family, participating in a variety of outdoor activities, playing games, and tinkering around the house.

  • Creating a Successful Carbon Monoxide Awareness Campaign

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This presentation covers awareness campaigns that take advantage of partnerships and educational outreach to boaters can provide the early-detection tools necessary to combat this silent killer on the water.​

    There’s nothing good about tragedies on the water, but the most important takeaways after an incident are heightened awareness and positive actions toward keeping other people safe from similar tragedies. When injuries or fatalities occur as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning, the families of the victims and other boaters often look back and try to figure out the signs that they may have missed that could have prevented the situation. Awareness campaigns that take advantage of partnerships and educational outreach to boaters can provide the early-detection tools necessary to combat this silent killer on the water.

    Lisa Dugan

    Recreation Safety Outreach Coordinator, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

    As the Recreation Safety Outreach Coordinator with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources in the Division of Enforcement Lisa Dugan provides statewide outreach and communication through the development of coordinated marketing goals and executed marketing plans to create a broad, statewide culture of outdoor recreation safety in Minnesota. 

    Grant Brown

    Boating Law Administrator, Colorado Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Parks & Wildlife

    Colorado Boating Law Administrator Grant Brown serves his state as the boating safety program manager. Brown has held the position since December of 2016. Through his roles within the Colorado Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Parks & Wildlife, Brown oversees law enforcement patrols on rivers and lakes. The state boating safety program also conducts boat handling, boat accident investigation (BAI), and boating under the influence (BUI) detection trainings for officers within the state; offers boating safety courses for the boating public; administers the commercial river outfitter licensing program; and oversees the Marine Evidence Recovery Team (MERT).