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  • Joint Safety Marketing: Boat Safe, Road Safe

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    ​Boat Safe, Road Safe is a partnering concept for cross-promoting highway and water safety.

    Boat Safe, Road Safe is a partnering concept for cross-promoting highway and water safety. By combining life jacket wear and seat belt usage, BUI/BWI and DUI/DWI, and inattentive operation and distracted driving, we are able to reach a larger audience to reinforce safety messages and encourage the public to practice safe vehicle operation, no matter what mode of transportation they are using. Attendees will receive all logos and educational materials, which can be easily modified with their state-specific information.

    Erika Brooks

    Boating Education Coordinator, Kansas Dept. of Wildlife, Parks & Tourism

    Erika Brooks joined the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks & Tourism in 2001 and has been the department’s boating education coordinator since 2004. Growing up in an outdoors family, she has always enjoyed boating, fishing, hunting, and camping, and she uses her experiences to help with her educational programs. Erika graduated from Wichita State University with a bachelor’s degree in business administration, majoring in marketing, and she uses those skills to promote safe boating throughout Kansas in creative ways. She has been an active member of NASBLA’s Education Committee for seven years, and most recently she became the Policy & Best Practices Subcommittee Chair. Erika is also chairs the Boating Education Advisory Panel and teaches the New Boating Education Coordinator Training, which is held before the NASBLA Annual Conference.

  • Training Boating Education Instructors

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This panel discussion will include an exploration of best practices for instructor selection, training methods, background checks, policy requirements, use of evaluations to improve programs, and certification requirements.​

    Does your state certify education program instructors? Want to explore policy and legal issues regarding instructor certification? This panel discussion will include an exploration of best practices for instructor selection, training methods, background checks, policy requirements, use of evaluations to improve programs, and certification requirements.

    Pam Dillon (Moderator)

    NASBLA Director of Education & Standards

    Pamela Dillon serves as director of NASBLA’s Education and Standards Division. In this role, she works to fully articulate NASBLA’s national role in standards development and conformity assessment, as well as providing broader and deeper professional development opportunities for our members and the recreational boating community. Previously, Dillon served as BLA, retiring in 2011 as chief of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Watercraft. During a five-year break in service from the state of Ohio, Dillon served as executive director of the American Canoe Association (2002-2007), working to develop strategic alliances with boating, outdoor recreation, and paddlesport education and conservation programs across the U.S. and Canada. Dillon served two terms as a public member of the National Boating Safety Advisory Council. In 2014 Dillon earned her credential as a Certified Association Executive (CAE) from ASAE.

    MariAnn McKenzie

    Boater Education Coordinator, Oregon State Marine Board

    MariAnn joined the Oregon State Marine Board’s boating safety section in March 2006. As the boater education coordinator, she wears several hats including Jr. Boater Coordinator, the School Program Coordinator, the “Let’s Go Boating” Grant Program Coordinator and the project manager for the Non-Motorized Project linked to the Marine Board’s Strategic Plan. Recently she attained her ACA Level I & II Instructor Certifications. Previously, MariAnn worked for the Arizona Game and Fish Department, where she was as a wildlife technician for five years, the boating education coordinator for a year and a half, the boating facilities program manager for three and a half years, and the executive staff assistant to the Branch Chief of Support Services for one year. Before college, she attended the National Park Service Law Enforcement Training at Silva, North Carolina. She then worked as a seasonal Boat Patrol Law Enforcement Officer for the Glen Canyon National Recreational Area, National Park Service. She was also a certified Emergency Medical Technician and worked several boating accidents. She graduated from Northern Arizona University with a bachelor of science degree in biology, with an emphasis in fish and wildlife management.

    Emily King

    Training Director, National Safe Boating Council

    As training director for the National Safe Boating Council (NSBC), Emily King manages and develops the organization’s on-water powerboating instructor courses, “Essentials of Close-Quarters Boat Control and Open Water Boat Control. Emily retired from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources after serving over 33 years. She was a state watercraft officer and helped to develop Ohio’s River Rescue Program, which was first in the country and a nationally and internationally recognized program. During her career with Ohio DNR, Emily became a nationally recognized expert in boating education and river rescue. She was a member of the NASBLA education committee for 12 years, during which she was instrumental in the development of boater education, testing and paddlesports standards. In 1997, Emily was promoted to Ohio’s Public Information and Education Manager, where she was asked to implement Ohio’s mandatory education program. She has been recognized by many organizations for her work and currently is the only two-time winner of the NASBLA’s Boating Safety Award, which she received in 1998 and 2008.

    Joy Hadley

    Director of Training, US Sailing

    Dr. Joy Hadley is the director of training for US Sailing, the national governing body for sailing and on-water training experts. She leads a team responsible for training sailboat, keelboat, powerboat and windsurfing instructors and certifying them to teach at yacht clubs, community sailing/boating programs and commercial boating schools. A workforce development and education professional, Dr. Hadley was previously the assistant chancellor of Professional and Continuing Education at the University of Massachusetts and the employee development leader for the U.S. Navy. She was introduced to sailing and boating as an adult and enjoys the water cruising and fishing. A longtime race committee member of the Newport Yacht Club, she is currently serving as regatta chair and a board member.

  • Interagency Interaction

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    2012 conference presentation on multi-agency collaborations.

    Hosted by the Preparedness and Response Committee this Panel Discussion focuses on “Multi-agency collaborations.” Our post-9/11 world clarified that the responsibility of our nation’s security and protection from natural disasters is equally divided among federal, state, local and tribal governments as well as the private sector. This responsibility has brought on the emergence of interagency cohesion, which can only be fulfilled through information sharing, communication interoperability and standardized training.

    Spencer Cole (Moderator)

    Lt. Colonel

    Brian Spillman

    Homeland Security Director

    Brad Williams

    Instructor

    Rodger Norcross

    BLA

    George Johnson

    BLA

  • Idaho Cold Water Training

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Idaho Cold Water Training

    In order to make first responders more aware of the dangers of cold water, the state boating program at the Idaho Department of Parks & Recreation has developed a four-hour training course. What started as informal block training for a local sheriff’s department has evolved into a formalized course that has been approved by Idaho POST. Idaho BLA Dave Dahms will discuss the origination and evolution of this training course over the past two years and how this important information has been integrated into the department’s public boat safety program.

    Dave Dahms

    BLA

  • Performance Report Part II: 101

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    It’s due every year by December 31. Performance Report Part II data, when viewed together, have the potential to determine future policies and identify program opportunities IF we could agree on what the data points mean! This session looks at the history of the report’s development, reviews and compares data collected from previous years, and provides a ‘101 Primer’ to improve accuracy of data collected via this form.

    It’s due every year by December 31. Performance Report Part II data, when viewed together, have the potential to determine future policies and identify program opportunities IF we could agree on what the data points mean! This session looks at the history of the report’s development, reviews and compares data collected from previous years, and provides a ‘101 Primer’ to improve accuracy of data collected via this form.

    Vann Burgess

    USCG RBS Specialist

    Pam Dillon

    NASBLA Director of Education & Standards

    Pamela Dillon serves as director of NASBLA’s Education and Standards Division. In this role, she works to fully articulate NASBLA’s national role in standards development and conformity assessment, as well as providing broader and deeper professional development opportunities for our members and the recreational boating community. Previously, Dillon served as BLA, retiring in 2011 as chief of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Watercraft. During a five-year break in service from the state of Ohio, Dillon served as executive director of the American Canoe Association (2002-2007), working to develop strategic alliances with boating, outdoor recreation, and paddlesport education and conservation programs across the U.S. and Canada. Dillon served two terms as a public member of the National Boating Safety Advisory Council. In 2014 Dillon earned her credential as a Certified Association Executive (CAE) from ASAE.

    Tammy Terry

    Boating Accident Program Manager

  • Alabama Boater Licensing

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Alabama Boater Licensing

    In 1994, Alabama passed one of the most comprehensive pieces of boating safety legislation in the nation, which included mandatory operator licensing. Now, 18 years later, is the program working? Has Alabama seen any definitive results? Explore mandatory licensing from an insider’s perspective.

    Erica Shipman

    Administrative Services Commander

  • Changes to the SNS, the VIS, and the BARD – Implications for the States

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Changes to the Standard Numbering System, the Vessel Identification System, and the Boating Accident Report Database – Implications for the States

    The Coast Guard issued its final rule on March 28, 2012 (Docket No. USCG-2003-14963) and amended its regulations related to numbering undocumented vessels and reporting boating accidents. These changes align and modernize terminology used in the Standard Numbering System (SNS), the Vessel Identification System (VIS), and accident reporting; require verification of vessel hull identification numbers; require SNS vessel owners to provide personally identifiable information; and provide flexibility for states and territories in administering these regulations. Together, the changes are intended to improve boating safety efforts, enhance law enforcement capabilities, clarify requirements for all stakeholders, and promote the Coast Guard strategic goals of maritime safety and security. Learn about the changes and what your organization needs to do to prepare for these regulatory changes by January 1, 2017.

    Vann Burgess

    USCG RBS Specialist

    Tammy Terry

    Boating Accident Program Manager

    Madelynn Fenske

    Customer Service Supervisor

  • GPS Forensics

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This introduction to GPS forensics will provide law enforcement officers with a foundation for recovering evidence from GPS devices and preparing it for courtroom presentation.

    Imagine if you could go back in time and place a tracking device on the vehicle or vessel of your suspect, or even place it on the suspect himself. The tracker could capture and store your suspect’s travels, recording where he went, what time, how fast, and how long he stayed. Boaters, anglers, and hunters across America are buying and using tracking devices every day – in the form of GPS units. Modern GPS devices are capable of storing vast amounts of navigational data in the form of maps, track lines, waypoints, routes, and more. Some of this data is captured and stored automatically by the device whenever it is in use. Other data is manually entered by the GPS user. In the hands of a law enforcement investigator, the data can be used as devastating evidence in a courtroom setting.

    This introduction to GPS forensics will provide law enforcement officers with a foundation for recovering evidence from GPS devices and preparing it for courtroom presentation. The class will take students through the history of the GPS system, describe the components of the system, and explain the basic concepts of how GPS works. Students will learn about the wide variety of devices that are on the market and the types of data the devices might hold. They will learn the best practices for securing a GPS for examination and the legal guidelines that must be followed. Finally, students will learn about the tools and software needed to conduct a basic examination of a GPS, and how to present the results.

    Paul Alber

    Officer, Palm Beach Police Department

    In 1993, after graduating with a bachelor’s degree from Florida State University, Paul Alber started his law enforcement career with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. He worked with local, state and federal agencies on a wide range of cases, from traffic citations to drug trafficking. He also became a field training officer and an agency instructor. An avid outdoorsman, Paul is often out fishing and diving. When his personal list of coordinates for reefs, wrecks, ledges grew into the hundreds, he began experimenting with various LORAN and GPS computer programs to manage his list of fishing spots and to plan offshore trips. He quickly realized that some of the software he was using had significant law enforcement applications and started using his knowledge of marine electronics, particularly GPS units, in boat crash reconstructions and marine fisheries enforcement. As his skills grew, other agencies began reaching out to him for assistance. In 2006, he joined the Palm Beach Police Department, where he was quickly assigned to the department’s marine unit. He now splits his time, patrolling both the streets of Palm Beach and the waters of South Florida. He routinely assists other agencies, particularly the Department of Homeland Security, providing expert assistance with GPS forensic analysis on a variety of cases.

    Raul “Skip” Camejo

    Captain, Connecticut State Environmental Conservation Police

    Raul “Skip” Camejo, a captain with the Connecticut State Environmental Conservation Police (En-Con Police), has served the EnCon Police for 19 years and is currently in command of the Western District. His previous assignments include administrative captain in the Hartford headquarters, training sergeant, and field officer. Before joining the EnCon Police, Camejo, who earned a bachelor of arts degree in criminal justice from Charter Oak State College, served 19½ years as a municipal police officer. Camejo is a past president of the Northeast Conservation Law Enforcement Chiefs Association and a member of NASBLA’s Enforcement Training Techniques and Technology subcommittee.

  • Public Relations & Death Notifications

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    A presentation on death notification.

    Joel Wilkinson and Kate Braestrup of Maine Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Warden Service will deliver a presentation on death notification. Notifying the family members of a deceased hiker, boater and or hunter can be as tough on the officer as it is on the family. Join Joel and Kate as they give you the tools to be effective and compassionate.

    Joel Wilkinson

    Colonel, Maine Warden Service

    Colonel Joel Wilkinson joined the Maine Warden Service in 1992 as a deputy game warden and has been in law enforcement for over 20 years. He served the Oxford County Sheriff’s Department and the Windham Police Department before becoming a full-time game warden in 1995. Joel is currently a game warden colonel, a position he has held for over four years serving under two separate governors for the State of Maine. He serves as the Inland State Boating Law Administrator for Maine. He is also on the Board of Trustees for the Maine Criminal Justice Academy and the Maine Drug Enforcement Advisory Board. While in the field supervisory role, Colonel Wilkinson was the dive team  for the Incident Management Team and supervised the Special Investigations Unit. While serving as the colonel and captain, Col. Wilkinson received the Manager of the Year award twice from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife and Governors Office in 2006 and 2010. He received the Maine State Police Colonels Award in 2002 for his work on a homicide investigation. He holds an associate’s degree in law enforcement from Southern Maine Community College.

    Kate Braestrup

    Chaplain, Maine Warden Service

    The daughter of a foreign correspondent, Kate Braestrup spent her childhood in Algiers, New York City, Paris, Bangkok, Washington, D.C., and Sabillasville, Maryland. Educated at the Parsons School of Design/The New School and Georgetown University, Braestrup originally thought of herself primarily as a writer. She had published a novel, Onion, in 1990, as well as occasional essays in national publications. Braestrup entered the Bangor Theological Seminary in 1997 and was ordained in 2004. Since 2001, she has served as chaplain to the Maine Warden Service, joining the wardens as they search the wild lands and fresh waters of Maine for those who have lost their way, and offering comfort to those who wait for the ones they love to be rescued, or for their bodies to be recovered.